The biggest barriers people with disabilities encounter are other people
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Disability

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Ageing; A Hindrance To Commuting

We are getting older
Problem: Public Transport System

The reality is even worse than what it seems, so here a few solutions to battle this issue.

Solution Number 1: The senior citizens face a lot of trouble in boarding and getting off the bus, the conductors or drivers are expected to guide them.

Solution Number 2: They can be guided on how to walk and hold inside the bus, so that the senior citizens are prevented from hurting themselves.

Solution Number 3: The bus must stop close to the curb.

Solution Number 4: The transport system must react to the demographic changes and be adapted to the senior citizen’s needs.

Solution Number 5: There should be proper initiatives from governing bodies regarding projects for older persons to understand their needs, wishes, fears and normal handicaps/ disabilities. Read more »

We are not disabled anymore, it’s time to go outdoors.

We support ReachAble, Do you?
ReachAble is known for its unique disabled friendly tour programs from its inception. From a Reachable perspective, these programs are capable enough to convey a message to the public that, there are people existing and it’s time to change our attitude towards disability and the disabled. Read more »

8 Benefits of an Inclusive Organization

1. Higher Job Satisfaction

WheelchairWhen you feel valued for your work and contributions, you’re going to be more satisfied with your job. Appreciation is an incredible motivator and doesn’t always mean giving away more money–it can be as simple as recognizing the individual for their hard work and dedication. Many companies do this well for their star executives, but what about for their star administrative assistants or technical gurus? Read more »

The Accessibility Quotient (AQ)

The Accessibility Quotient (AQ), a new measure for assisting authors and librarians in assessing and characterizing the degree of accessibility for a group of papers, is proposed and described. Read more »

Universal design- The seven principles

Principle 1: Equitable Use
The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.

Guidelines:
1a. Provide the same means of use for all users: identical whenever possible; equivalent when not.
1b. Avoid segregating or stigmatizing any users.
1c. Provisions for privacy, security, and safety should be equally available to all users. Read more »

Universal design for your kitchen

Kitchen for all
Unlike universal kitchens designed years ago, universal design today doesn’t mean boring design, but quite the opposite.

It is important to note that universal design practices are broader than that of barrier-free design, and are in fact universal. Almost without exception, features or flexibility added to a product to accommodate individuals with temporarily or permanently reduced abilities in some areas have proven to be beneficial to users in general. In many cases, more people without a disability will find features useful than the number of people in the original target audience. Read more »

10 Barriers to the uptake of Cycling & Walking


1) Safety and Security Concerns

Safety relates to the perceived or actual danger encountered whilst cycling on the road, or walking from A to B: ‘Stranger Danger’. Security relates to unsafe storage of bicycles or associated equipment.
Read more »

Why is enabling access important?

Social
To ensure equality of access and to enable more people to participate in travel.

Business
To encourage more people to use our services and therefore keep us in business.

Legal
To meet the requirements of the law. Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. You are in a grocery store with your children when a man in an electric wheelchair enters. Your children ask in loud voices: "Why is that man sitting down?" Then they go over to him and ask: "What's wrong with you?" Your response should be: Read more »