The biggest barriers people with disabilities encounter are other people
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Built Environment Determinants of Physical Activity


People are more likely to walk if:

  • Walking trails, parks and gyms are accessible
  • Sidewalks present and scenery are enjoyable
  • Many people are out walking or exercising
  • Friend(s) are available with whom to walk

People are less likely to exercise if:

  • Too little time
  • Too tired
  • Unmotivated
  • Perceived traffic, crime or other danger
  • Long distance to exercise location

10 Barriers to the uptake of Cycling & Walking


1) Safety and Security Concerns

Safety relates to the perceived or actual danger encountered whilst cycling on the road, or walking from A to B: ‘Stranger Danger’. Security relates to unsafe storage of bicycles or associated equipment.
Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. You see a woman with a disability struggling to get a package off of the floor and into her lap. You approach her and ask if she would like some assistance. She snaps angrily at you, saying that she can get it herself without your help. You conclude that: Read more »

Why is enabling access important?

Social
To ensure equality of access and to enable more people to participate in travel.

Business
To encourage more people to use our services and therefore keep us in business.

Legal
To meet the requirements of the law. Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. You are in a grocery store with your children when a man in an electric wheelchair enters. Your children ask in loud voices: "Why is that man sitting down?" Then they go over to him and ask: "What's wrong with you?" Your response should be: Read more »

Being Prepared

Always be on the lookout;
Look directly at the boarding passengers,
greet them,
Listen carefully if they start to talk from outside the bus,
Be aware of passengers having difficulties boarding,
Look directly at their faces,
Note signs of stress, Allow time
Reassure hesitant passengers Read more »

During an emergency evacuation-Assisting a person in a wheel chair

Bumping on a series of steps;
In situations where the wheelchair user must be carried up or down a flight of steps, it is necessary to have a minimum of two persons assisting. Four persons may be needed in the case of a heavy adult. The strongest person(s) should be placed at the back of the chair. If an assisting person has a medical condition that prohibits lifting, it is advisable to enlist the assistance of a different volunteer. Read more »

Models of Disability

There are 2 main models of disability.

1.The medical model, where the medical or diagnosed condition (e.g., deafness, paralysis) is seen as the disabling factor. Professionals (e.g., doctors, rehabilitation workers) are seen as the ‘experts’ in determining what is right for the person. This identifies the person with an impairment as a ‘problem’ that needs to be solved or ‘cured’ and gives them little control over their life. Read more »

Myths And Realities about People with Disabilities

1.Myth:
Equal opportunity means that everyone should be treated the same – so students with disabilities are not entitled to support services.

Reality:
Equal opportunity means all people should be treated in a way that enables them to achieve their potential. Provision of support services assists students with such tasks as reading and processing information, conducting library research, preparing assignments, photocopying and performing manual procedures.

2.Myth: Read more »