The biggest barriers people with disabilities encounter are other people
Skip to top of page

Syndicate

Syndicate content

SoMe Links



TwitterYoutube
Facebook
Pinterest
Flickr
Rss feed
Linkedin
RSS Feed
Linkedin

Skip to top of page

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. Which of the following has not been heard of? Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. You are teaching a freshman college class in which there is one student with a disability. This student is working very hard and doing the best she can. However, even her best work is only "D" quality. She is very eager to do well. You are afraid that if you give her a "D" she will get discouraged and give up. It is time for mid-term grades; you should: Read more »

Universal design for your kitchen

Kitchen for all
Unlike universal kitchens designed years ago, universal design today doesn’t mean boring design, but quite the opposite.

It is important to note that universal design practices are broader than that of barrier-free design, and are in fact universal. Almost without exception, features or flexibility added to a product to accommodate individuals with temporarily or permanently reduced abilities in some areas have proven to be beneficial to users in general. In many cases, more people without a disability will find features useful than the number of people in the original target audience. Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. A person with a hearing impairment who is a good lip reader will be able to see the following percentage of spoken sounds by watching the lips of a speaker. Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. You are talking to a person who is deaf through a sign language interpreter. At the end of the conversation, you decide to talk to the interpreter. As you begin talking, the interpreter continues to sign. You stop him, saying, "You don't have to sign this." However, the interpreter continues to sign everything you say. At this point you should: Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. You are talking to a woman with a severe speech impairment. You have asked the woman to repeat herself in order to understand what she is saying. The person has repeated one phrase five times and you still don't understand it. You should: Read more »

Importance of Universal Design

Universal design
When designers apply universal design principles, their products and services meet the needs of potential users with a wide variety of characteristics. Designing any product or service involves the consideration of many factors, including aesthetics, engineering options, environmental issues, safety concerns, and cost. Often the design is created for the "average" user. In contrast, "universal design" is "the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design." Disability is just one of many characteristics that an individual might possess. By developing an accessible product or service, the need for adaptations at a later time can be minimized or eliminated. Read more »

Test Your Disability Awareness

1)Blind people live in total darkness – False

A lot of people don't realize that few people registered blind can see nothing at all. And how much someone can see will vary from person to person. A minority of people can distinguish light but nothing else. Some people have no central vision, others have no side vision. Some people see everything as a vague blur, others see a patchwork of blanks and defined areas.

2)When someone is reading your lips you should exaggerate sounds - False Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. Which of the following positions has not been filled by a person who is legally blind?
a) photographer Read more »

Promote Walking

Why Walking?
Walking

  • It’s a widely accepted activity
  • It can be done in a variety of settings
  • It promotes other beneficial outcomes (e.g., environment, transportation)
  • It’s relatively inexpensive compared to other physical activities

10 Good Health Reasons to Walk:

  • Gives you ENERGY
  • Increases your METABOLISM
  • Can change your MOOD