The biggest barriers people with disabilities encounter are other people
Skip to top of page

Syndicate

Syndicate content

SoMe Links



TwitterYoutube
Facebook
Pinterest
Flickr
Rss feed
Linkedin
RSS Feed
Linkedin

Skip to top of page

Big breakthrough in cure for blindness - Times of India


Times of India
Big breakthrough in cure for blindness
Times of India
The breakthrough could lead to the production of artificial tissue grafts made from the variety of cells found in the human retina and may aid in the search to cure blindness.
Read more »

Parsons Tasks Students To Improve The Museum Experience For The Disabled - PSFK



Parsons Tasks Students To Improve The Museum Experience For The Disabled
PSFK
Parsons teamed with the Metropolitan Museum of Art to increase accessibility in the museum for people with disabilities.

Read more »

New multisport wheelchair launched



A BACKWELL charity has launched its new multisport wheelchair with the aim of encouraging more disabled people to take up sports.

Could printed eye cells be a cure for blindness? - Metro



Metro
Could printed eye cells be a cure for blindness?
Metro
Could printed eye cells be a cure for blindness? Aidan Radnedge Wednesday 18 Dec 2013 6:37 am. Use ← → keys to. Could printed eye cells be a cure for blindness?

Read more »

8 Benefits of an Inclusive Organization

1. Higher Job Satisfaction

WheelchairWhen you feel valued for your work and contributions, you’re going to be more satisfied with your job. Appreciation is an incredible motivator and doesn’t always mean giving away more money–it can be as simple as recognizing the individual for their hard work and dedication. Many companies do this well for their star executives, but what about for their star administrative assistants or technical gurus? Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. After explaining a complex point, you turn to your coworkers and say, "Do you see what I mean?" As soon as the words are out of your mouth, you wonder if it was inappropriate to use that phrase since one of the people you are talking to is blind. At this point you should: Read more »

The Accessibility Quotient (AQ)

The Accessibility Quotient (AQ), a new measure for assisting authors and librarians in assessing and characterizing the degree of accessibility for a group of papers, is proposed and described. Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. Which of the following disabilities prevent a person from getting a driver's license?
a) deafness Read more »

Responding to Disability: A Question of Attitude

This questionnaire is designed to stimulate thinking and dialogue. It is not intended to test knowledge of disability or attitudes toward people with disabilities. As people increasingly find themselves in situations involving people who are disabled they need to make quick decisions on how to respond. This questionnaire provides an opportunity to think about situations involving people with disabilities, to respond, and then to consider the various responses more carefully.

Q. You are in a restaurant and you notice two people who are deaf communicating silently in sign language. When a waitress goes to their table, one person gives his order out loud, but his voice is strange, hard to understand, and too loud for the quiet restaurant. The second person does not speak, but points to items on the menu. You conclude that: Read more »

Universal design- The seven principles

Principle 1: Equitable Use
The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.

Guidelines:
1a. Provide the same means of use for all users: identical whenever possible; equivalent when not.
1b. Avoid segregating or stigmatizing any users.
1c. Provisions for privacy, security, and safety should be equally available to all users. Read more »